The Golden Rule: Treat Others the Way You Want to Be Treated

  The golden rule is a moral principle which denotes that you should treat others the way you want to be treated yourself. For example, the golden rule suggests that if you would like people to treat you with respect, then you should make sure to treat them with respect too. The golden rule is …

Read more

The Availability Cascade: How Information Spreads on a Large Scale

  An availability cascade is a self-reinforcing process where a certain stance gains increasing prominence in public discourse, which increases its availability to people and which therefore makes them more likely to believe it and spread it further. For example, an availability cascade could occur in a situation where a news story triggers a wave …

Read more

Cherry Picking: When People Ignore Evidence that They Dislike

  Cherry picking is a logical fallacy that occurs when someone focuses only on evidence that supports their stance, while ignoring evidence that contradicts it. For example, a person who engages in cherry picking might mention only a small number of studies out of all the studies which were published on a certain topic, in an …

Read more

The Just-World Hypothesis: On the Belief that Everyone Gets What They Deserve

  The just-world hypothesis is a cognitive bias that causes people to assume that people’s actions always lead to fair consequences, meaning that those who do good are eventually rewarded, while those who do evil are eventually punished. For example, the just-world hypothesis could cause someone to assume that if someone else experienced a tragic …

Read more

The Appeal to Emotion: Persuasion Through Feelings Rather than Facts

  The appeal to emotion is a logical fallacy that occurs when a misleading argument, and particularly one that is unsound or missing factual evidence, is used with the goal of manipulating people’s emotions. For example, a person using an appeal to emotion in a debate might encourage the audience to ignore facts that their …

Read more

The Rhyme-as-Reason Effect: Why Rhyming Makes Your Message More Persuasive

  The rhyme-as-reason effect is a cognitive bias that makes people more likely to remember, repeat, and believe statements that contain a rhyme, compared to those that do not. For example, people generally perceive the aphorism “woes unite foes” as more accurate than the aphorisms “woes unite enemies” or “misfortunes unite foes”, despite the fact that they …

Read more

The False-Consensus Effect: Why People Assume that Everyone Agrees with Them

  The false-consensus effect is a cognitive bias that causes people to overestimate the degree to which others are like them, in terms of sharing things such as their beliefs, values, characteristics, experiences, and behaviors. Essentially, this means that the false consensus effect leads people to assume that are similar to them in various ways, …

Read more

Deadlines: How Effective Time Constraints Can Boost Productivity

  A deadline is a point in time by which something must be done. Deadlines can be implemented by and for various types of entities, such as individuals and companies, and in various types of domains, such as school and the workplace. Deadlines can be beneficial in various ways, so it’s worthwhile to understand how …

Read more