The Psychologist’s Fallacy: Why It’s Wrong to Assume that Your Interpretation is Right

  The psychologist’s fallacy is a logical fallacy which occurs when an external observer assumes that their subjective interpretation of an event represents the objective nature of that event. For example, the psychologist’s fallacy occurs when a psychologist assumes that their interpretation of why a patient acted the way that they did must be true. …

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The Rhyme-as-Reason Effect: Why Rhyming Makes Your Message More Persuasive

  The rhyme-as-reason effect is a cognitive bias that causes statements to be more memorable and persuasive when they contain a rhyme. For example, the aphorism “caution and measure will win you treasure” is generally perceived by people as being more accurate and truthful than the aphorisms “caution and restraint will win you treasure” or …

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