Red Herring: How People Use Irrelevant Information as a Distraction

  A red herring is something that distracts people from an important issue or from an issue that is currently being discussed. Accordingly, the red herring fallacy is a logical fallacy where someone presents an irrelevant piece of information in an attempt to distract their opponent and the audience from the topic which is being discussed, … Read moreRed Herring: How People Use Irrelevant Information as a Distraction

The Divine Fallacy: When People Use ‘God’ as the Explanation

  The divine fallacy is a logical fallacy where someone assumes that a certain phenomenon must occur as a result of divine intervention, simply because they don’t know how else to explain it, or because they can’t imagine that this isn’t the case. For example, if someone doesn’t understand how evolution works, they might display … Read moreThe Divine Fallacy: When People Use ‘God’ as the Explanation

The Argument from Incredulity: How People Explain What They Don’t Understand

  The argument from incredulity is a logical fallacy where someone assumes that if they can’t believe that a certain concept is true, then it must be false, and vice versa. For example, if someone doesn’t understand how evolution works, they might use the argument from incredulity in order to claim that the theory of … Read moreThe Argument from Incredulity: How People Explain What They Don’t Understand

Gish Gallop: When People Try to “Prove” Things By Using Overwhelming Nonsense

  The Gish gallop is a debate technique which involves overwhelming your opponent with as many arguments as possible, with no regard to the relevance, validity, or accuracy of these arguments. This debate technique is rapidly becoming more and more commonplace, so it is important to understand it. In the following article, you will learn … Read moreGish Gallop: When People Try to “Prove” Things By Using Overwhelming Nonsense

The ‘Appeal to Novelty’ Fallacy: Why New Isn’t Necessarily Better

  The appeal to novelty is a logical fallacy where something is assumed to be good, solely because it is new and modern, or bad, solely because it is old. Because this kind of thinking frequently plays a role in people’s thought process, it’s important to understand it. In the following article, you will learn … Read moreThe ‘Appeal to Novelty’ Fallacy: Why New Isn’t Necessarily Better

Ad Hominem: How People Use Personal Attacks to Win Arguments

  An ad hominem argument is an argument that attacks a person directly, instead of addressing the point that they are trying to make. This rhetorical technique is frequently used in discussions on various topics, so it’s important to understand it. In the following article, you will learn more about ad hominem arguments, see what types … Read moreAd Hominem: How People Use Personal Attacks to Win Arguments

The Masked-Man Fallacy: Twisting Arguments Through Invalid Substitutions

  The masked-man fallacy is a logical fallacy where the substitution of two identical entities leads to a flaw in the logic of an argument. A classic example for this fallacy is the following: Premise 1: I know who my father is. Premise 2: I don’t know who the masked-man is. Fallacious conclusion: the masked-man … Read moreThe Masked-Man Fallacy: Twisting Arguments Through Invalid Substitutions

The ‘Appeal to Nature’ Fallacy: Why Natural Isn’t Always Better

  An appeal to nature is an argument that claims that something is either good because it is considered ‘natural’, or bad because it is considered ‘unnatural’. Because this kind of fallacious thinking frequently plays a role in debates on various topics, it is important to fully understand it. The following article will explain how … Read moreThe ‘Appeal to Nature’ Fallacy: Why Natural Isn’t Always Better