The Napoleon Technique: Postponing Things to Increase Productivity

  The Napoleon technique is a productivity technique that involves postponing dealing with something, if there is a good chance that it will get properly resolved without your immediate input. For example, based on the Napoleon technique, you could decide to wait a day before replying to emails that ask for your advice on non-urgent …

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Bikeshedding and the Law of Triviality: Why People Focus on Minor Issues

  Bikeshedding (also referred to as the law of triviality) describes a phenomenon where people spend a relatively large amount of time, energy, and other resources dealing with relatively minor issues. For example, a corporate committee who engages in bikeshedding might spend more time discussing the construction of a small bikeshed compared to the construction of an …

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Premature Optimization: What It Is and How to Avoid It

  Premature optimization is the act of trying to make things more efficient at a stage when it is too early to do so. For example, premature optimization could involve someone spending a lot of time and money picking out the best possible gear for a certain hobby, despite the fact that they haven’t actually …

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Deadlines: How Effective Time Constraints Can Boost Productivity

  Deadlines are a simple but powerful time-management technique that can help you become much more productive if you know how to implement them properly. In the following article, you will first learn a bit about the concept of deadlines, and about why using them can be beneficial. Then, you will see guidelines for setting …

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Good Enough is Good Enough: Let Go of Perfectionism to Get Things Done

  The principle of good enough suggests that you should identify the point past which putting more resources into something won’t improve it in a meaningful manner, so you should finish with it and move on. Essentially, this means that you should embrace the idea that good enough is good enough, instead of wasting valuable …

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The Pareto Principle: 80% of Outcomes Come from 20% of Causes

  The Pareto principle (also known as the 80/20 rule) is the adage that in many situations, 80% of outcomes are derived from 20% of causes. For example, the Pareto principle could mean that, when it comes to movies, 20% of the films that are being shown in cinemas are responsible for 80% of the ticket …

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Mise en Place: How to Be More Efficient in the Kitchen and in Life

  Mise en place (pronounced mee-zon-plas) is a French culinary term which means “putting in place”, and which denotes that you should plan and prepare for a task before you start working on it. Mise en place is most often used in a culinary context, where it signifies that you should prepare all the necessary …

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