The Masked-Man Fallacy: Twisting Arguments Through Invalid Substitutions

  The masked-man fallacy is a logical fallacy where the substitution of two identical entities leads to a flaw in the logic of an argument. A classic example for this fallacy is the following: Premise 1: I know who my father is. Premise 2: I don’t know who the masked-man is. Fallacious conclusion: the masked-man … Read moreThe Masked-Man Fallacy: Twisting Arguments Through Invalid Substitutions

The ‘Appeal to Nature’ Fallacy: Why Natural Isn’t Always Better

  An appeal to nature is an argument that claims that something is either good because it is considered ‘natural’, or bad because it is considered ‘unnatural’. Because this kind of fallacious thinking frequently plays a role in debates on various topics, it is important to fully understand it. The following article will explain how … Read moreThe ‘Appeal to Nature’ Fallacy: Why Natural Isn’t Always Better

The ‘Appeal to the Stone’ Fallacy: On Being Completely Dismissive in Arguments

  The appeal to the stone is a logical fallacy where a person simply dismisses a claim as absurd, without actually addressing it or showing proof for its absurdity. The following article will explain to you how this fallacy works, how you can counter people who use it, and how you can use it yourself in … Read moreThe ‘Appeal to the Stone’ Fallacy: On Being Completely Dismissive in Arguments

Strawman Arguments: What They Are and How to Counter Them

  A strawman argument is a fallacious argument that distorts an opposing stance in order to make it easier to attack. Essentially, the person using the strawman pretends to attack their opponent’s stance, while in reality they are actually attacking a distorted version of that stance which their opponent doesn’t necessarily support. For example, if someone says … Read moreStrawman Arguments: What They Are and How to Counter Them